In a Nutshell

Declare in a Nutshell

Tim Powers, the author of “Declare,” stands out from the crowd of contemporary novelists because he is a faithful Catholic who has somehow managed to swim in the toxic mainstream without compromising his faith or principles.

Vinland in a Nutshell

Some authors and some books are not as well-known as they should be. This is indubitably the case with George Mackay Brown and his tour de force of a novel: Vinland.

The Violent Bear It Away in a Nutshell

Flannery O’Conner’s modus operandi as a writer was the employment of violence and the grotesque to shock her readers out of their somnambulant indifference to truth.

Till We Have Faces

Till We Have Faces in a Nutshell

C.S. Lewis called Till We Have Faces “my best book” and “far and away the best I have written.” He said it was the “favourite of all my books.”

The Hobbit in a Nutshell

At its deepest level, The Hobbit can be seen as a parabolic commentary on the words from St. Matthew’s Gospel that where our treasure is, there our heart will be also.

C in a Nutshell

“C” by Maurice Baring is little known, but received the highest of praise from the French novelist André Maurois, who wrote that no book had given him such pleasure since his reading of Tolstoy, Proust, and certain novels by E.M. Forster.

The Ball and the Cross in a Nutshell

The overarching spirit of “The Ball and the Cross” can be encapsulated in a comment that Chesterton made of his relationship with his brother: we were always arguing, but we never quarreled.

Lord of the World in a Nutshell

Lord of the World foresees with astonishing prescience the rise of the cult of personality, long before the rise of Lenin, Stalin, Mussolini and Hitler

By What Authority? in a Nutshell

“By What Authority” brings the period of the Tudor Terror to life in a way that is hardly possible in a non-fictional historical narrative. We get to know the characters as they come to terms with the tyrannous time in which they’re living.

The Four Men in a Nutshell

Home, like Rome, is a “holy place,” and The Four Men is full of spiritual premonitions of “the character of enduring things” amid the decay of time.

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