06/01/2002

The April 24 communiqué from the meeting of the U.S. cardinals at the Vatican is really an agenda for the June meeting of the U.S. bishops in Dallas. Although the communiqué failed to spell out a "zero tolerance" policy for first-time sex abusers, its intent is clear: The communiqué, along with the public statements of [...]

The April 24 communiqué from the meeting of the U.S. cardinals at the Vatican is really an agenda for the June meeting of the U.S. bishops in Dallas. Although the communiqué failed to spell out a "zero tolerance" policy for first-time sex abusers, its intent is clear: The communiqué, along with the public statements of [...]

Nearly three decades after its appearance, Justice Harry Blackmun's opinion in Roe v. Wade hovers like a toxic cloud over American law and culture. In seeking to liberate women from the tyranny of "unwanted" pregnancies, he refused to address the moral status of the tiny humans whose elimination he ensured. Blackmun claimed with false humility [...]

Had you ventured to Washington, D.C.'s L'Enfant Plaza Hotel one day last February for the second meeting of President George W. Bush's Council on Bioethics, it might have struck you that the man in the chairman's seat—the one governing this illustrious body that will lead the nation's thinking on everything from cloning to euthanasia—seemed very [...]

The Catholic Church in America is at a watershed. The current crisis is the culmination of decades of bad management, errant theology, and sinful behavior. It is partly about sex and partly about bishops. It is also about deluded therapies and an institutional Church that often goes flopping along with the mainstream on moral issues. [...]

Working away in relative obscurity without funding or mainstream recognition, Dr. Theodore Rockwell, with thick spectacles, a gray beard, and a stoop in his 80-year-old frame, paces his book-lined office. Rockwell's eyes shine over his current fascination: a uranium mine in Boulder, Montana, where he's taking his "sore and aching wife," Mary, this month. "It's [...]

Ecstatic dancers whirl around a woodland bonfire. Spells are cast in suburban living rooms. A pentagram-wearing priestess wanders through an interfaith festival. Today, witches can be as near as next door—and in the public square as well. Wicca is a conspicuous part of a burgeoning pagan revival in the Western world. Although hard numbers are [...]

The emblematic conversion stories have traditionally emphasized drama. As Saul approached Damascus, intending to bring any who belonged to the Way to Jerusalem for judgment by the chief priests, "suddenly a light from heaven flashed about him. And he fell to the ground and heard a voice saying to him, 'Saul, Saul, why do you [...]

On February 1, Jim Towey was named director of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives. Deal W. Hudson recently spoke with him about the Bush administration's plan to allow more federal funding for church-based charity organizations. Deal W Hudson: Jim, you've had a fascinating journey in your life that involved a meeting [...]

"We have cut the throats of the seven monks as we said we would do. It happened this morning. May God be praised." This expression of ferocious Muslim piety appeared in a communiqué signed by Emir Abou abd al Rahmen Amin on May 21, 1995, and records the deaths of seven Trappist monks who had [...]

According to the Los Angeles Times, which ought to know, Hollywood is cleaning up on G- and PG-rated movies. Three of the four top-grossing films of 2001—Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, Shrek, and Monsters, Inc.—were made for kids, and a number of similar pictures also did unexpectedly well. No doubt this has something to [...]

When I interviewed America's great composer David Diamond (b. 1915) in Crisis several years ago, he lamented that he most likely would not live to see his eleven string quartets recorded. "I think the story may end up being like Shostakovitch's," he said. "Nobody really knew anything about his string quartets until after his death." [...]

A few months ago in the pages of the Washington Post, Michael Kinsley wrote a piece about the dominance of conservative authors on best-seller lists. He rejected all the usual excuses that liberals give for the success of conservatives in the marketplace—that liberals read more broadly and don't care about "tawdry best-sellers," that conservative networks [...]

Following the parable of the two sons and leading up to that of the marriage of the king's son, the second of the high messianic parables preached in Jerusalem cannot be enjoyable to the Temple officials. They must roll their eyes as Jesus says, "Hear another parable." The common crowd relishes the discomfort of the [...]

Editor's Note: This month, Father Schall addresses a question posed in last month's symposium, "Christianity From the Outside": "How do you reconcile Jesus' injunction to give away your worldly goods and live as the lilies of the field with the pursuit and enjoyment of wealth?" American Christians are said to be at ease in our [...]

It is odd in war-time to have vicarious suffering regarded as the single biggest obstacle to accepting Christianity. Christopher Hitchens made this claim in last issue's "Christianity From the Outside": "The largest problem [with Christianity] is a simple one. The doctrine of vicarious redemption—of the casting of our sins upon a scape-goat—is positively immoral and [...]

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