10/01/2001

If I can curb my logorrhea, I will attempt to cover more new releases in capsule reviews in this article than ever before. The number of new CDs from my favorite labels belies the mourning over the demise of the classical music business, and I must catch up with them. The major labels may be [...]

If I can curb my logorrhea, I will attempt to cover more new releases in capsule reviews in this article than ever before. The number of new CDs from my favorite labels belies the mourning over the demise of the classical music business, and I must catch up with them. The major labels may be [...]

Some Crisis readers may be startled by the lead story in this issue, "The Price of Priestly Pederasty." They might argue that such a story damages the Church's reputation and hurts the Church's evangelical outreach. While such arguments are plausible, they also can undermine Catholic journalism and its benefits if they are used to discourage [...]

A few years ago, the state of Ohio began a voucher program in the city of Cleveland, providing a $2,250 tuition credit to low-income parents who wished to send their children to private schools. Last December, the Sixth Court of Appeals said the program was an unconstitutional "establishment" of religion because a majority of parents [...]

Rudy Kos, former Catholic priest and convicted molester of altar boys, just spent another hot summer in the unair-conditioned Texas prison where he is serving four life sentences for hundreds of incidents of sexual abuse of minors during the 1980s and early 1990s. While Kos, 56, was hardly the first Catholic priest to sexually abuse [...]

Since the Enlightenment, rationalists have liked to cite witch-burning as a prime example of medieval ignorance and religious (usually Catholic) bigotry run amok. (Leftists today still denounce it as a cynical plot by the strong against the weak.) Writing history that way was simple: Historians catalogued horrors, disparaged religion (or at least someone else's religion), [...]

In May 1964, in the middle of the Second Vatican Council, I published a book, The Open Church, an optimistic assessment of the changes in the Catholic Church that I believed the council would produce. I had written it in white-hot haste in my room at the Pensione Baldoni in Rome during a six-week period [...]

Over the past 20 years, the language of business life has become replete with ethical phraseology. Words such as "social responsibility," "business ethics," and "triple bottom line" bounce around in MBA classes, in corporate boardrooms, and even on stock trading floors. This phenomenon is not limited to the business world. Individual and institutional investors regularly [...]

This past winter, the illustrious and venerable New York publishing house Alfred A. Knopf published the third and final volume of Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials trilogy. Its title is The Amber Spyglass, and it runs 518 handsomely laid-out pages. The English-born, Oxford-educated Pullman had earmarked his first two volumes for the "young adult" market, [...]

Some conservatives look back with nostalgia at the Cold War. It gave us, they believe, a moral crusade that kept our country at least minimally engaged in something loftier than the getting and spending that are so much a part of modern American life. I am not one of these romantics. Too many people suffered [...]

Good art, like grace, sometimes comes in peculiar-looking packages. Terry Zwigoff's Ghost World, a screen version of the underground comic book by Daniel Clowes, is a bleakly melancholic comedy about a pair of foul-mouthed teenage girls. You wouldn't expect it to be much more than a symptom of the degraded state of postmodern American life—but [...]

Many people see America as the new Rome. Americans are builders and organizers, practical people who, when in need of culture, borrow from Europe just as Rome borrowed from Greece. Of course, there is truth in this comparison, but it has its limits. It is precisely the practical nature of the American people that insulated [...]

This past June, we at Crisis published a funny and affecting essay by Mary Walsh (see her review, "Beads of Power," in this issue on page 49), whose acquaintances couldn't stop twitting her and her husband for daring to have six children. We gave Walsh's essay a humorous title: "Wanted by the Fertility Police?' Recently, [...]

I remember with special affection a certain professor of mine who once said to a prolific rival: "I see you've written another book. What are you calling it this time?" In the same way, commentators often lump Christ's parable of the tares in the field (Matthew 13:24-30, 36-43) with His parable of the fishing net [...]

In an old "peanuts" cartoon, Charlie is sitting in a big comfortable chair, quietly reading a book, when his little sister, Sally, walks by, also reading a book. She announces, "We have to write a short piece for school that expresses our personal philosophy...." Charlie turns around with considerable perplexity as she continues: "So far, [...]

Orson Welles once told the possibly apocryphal story of getting a pass for Citizen Kane from the Legion of Decency by ostentatiously spilling a rosary onto the floor while taking something from his pocket. The ultimate prop. But even boy geniuses would be better advised to see the rosary as a means to get past [...]

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