07/01/1999

This month, Crisis is devoting an entire issue to a single topic, something we have never done before. What one issue could be so fundamental to Catholics everywhere? The conflict between the Holy See and the presidents of most of the approximately 200 U.S. colleges and universities that claim to be Catholic. The U.S. bishops [...]

This month, Crisis is devoting an entire issue to a single topic, something we have never done before. What one issue could be so fundamental to Catholics everywhere? The conflict between the Holy See and the presidents of most of the approximately 200 U.S. colleges and universities that claim to be Catholic. The U.S. bishops [...]

The drama surrounding Ex Corde Ecclesiae (1990) didn't rise from nowhere. Rather, it began unobtrusively in 1949, when the Vatican created the International Federation of Catholic Universities (IFCU). The IFCU invited only those chartered and overseen by the Holy See itself. More than half of the institutional activity in Catholic higher education was concentrated in [...]

In the spring of 1985 began what would be a strenuous struggle between the Holy See and the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities (ACCU) over the fate of Catholic higher education in the United States. It continues to this day. The Congregation for Catholic Education, then presided over by an American, William Cardinal Baum, [...]

What made the presidents especially uneasy with the apostolic constitution was its explicit insistence that the bishops were not "external agents but participants." Indeed, each university was "to maintain communion" with its own bishop, the national conference, and the Holy See, and to give a periodic account of the indicators of its Catholic identity. The [...]

What, then, are the particulars of this struggle between the college and university presidents and the pope? There are three. Rome insists that any university that puts itself forward publicly as Catholic should have a public acknowledgement from pope or bishops that it is worthy such a trust. Rome also insists that a Catholic education [...]

We are told that the third requirement of the pope and the draft Ordinances, Catholic theologians with credentials from their bishops, has agitated the presidents more than the other points at issue. This is strange, for the other two imperatives are much more important for their survival. It may be that the presidents, like the [...]

This issue marks the first time, in my tenure as editor, that Crisis has devoted its entire features section to a single topic and a single author. Crisis takes this step confident our readers will agree that the time is long overdue to tell the whole story of Ex Corde Ecclesiae ("Out of the Heart [...]

Utilitarian philosopher Peter Singer has for many years contemplated the mysteries of the human condition from his perch at Australia's Monash University. His studied conclusion, articulated in numerous articles and books, is that traditional morality is so much delusional hogwash. If you look closely at what most men do, as opposed to what they claim [...]

It was a dinner in Pasadena, with friends who were journalists and professors. In the face of their skepticism I was trying to explain again why I was encouraging the candidacies of Gary Bauer and Steve Forbes, despite the fact that the odds at the moment were running against them. Bauer had long ago cultivated [...]

The French, as usual, got it wrong: The more things change, the worse they get. As far back as 1974, the famously dyspeptic John Simon, who revels in cursing the darkness, was pointing out that American movies "do not (cannot? dare not?) cope with serious, contemporary, middle-class, adult problems ....What is virtually nonexistent is serious [...]

The classical music business is supposed to be in dire straits. With the profusion of new releases, many featuring compositions that one never dared dream to hear, one can only wonder what things would be like if they were going well. The spring issue of the Schwann/Opus Catalog, which lists available classical music recordings, is [...]

To investigate the quack theory of animal magnetism, a hypothesis of Franz Mesmer, for whom mesmerism is named, King Louis XVI appointed a committee that included Benjamin Franklin, for whom the Franklin stove is named, and Joseph Guillotin, for whom the guillotine is named. The king's own decapitation on that machine was, as an American [...]

Any thinking person today senses something wrong with modern society. Despite the phenomenal prosperity and security we enjoy, we intuit that things are just not right. We point to crime, family breakdown, or spectacular school violence. But particular issues do not get at a deeper question. Fortunately, a brilliant formulation has recently appeared from Francis [...]

Jean Guitton, the 97-year-old French writer and philosopher, died in Paris on March 27, 1999. In his New York Times obituary, Eric Pace writes, "After imbibing basic religious and ethical principles, Professor Guitton was able to square his Catholic faith with the teachings of science and history in his day" One cannot help but be [...]

Archbishop Charles Chaput of Denver has become one of the voices whom we count on for a clear, correct statement of the Church's mission in the world. In February, Chaput spoke to Catholic educators and parents about "forming disciples for the third millennium." By formation, he means not stuffing young heads full of facts, but [...]

In 1962 John Steinbeck wrote Travels with Charley, the account of his journey across the country with his dog in a truck converted into a mobile home. Born in California, settled in Long Island, but having recently spent years in Europe, the writer wanted to reconnect with the source of his inspiration. Stevenson wrote Travels [...]

MENU