02/01/1993

Ralph McInerny and I launched this journal in November 1982 with approximately $3,000 of our own money. We weren't sure we'd last for a second issue, let alone for ten years. Thanks to the more than 300 writers who have appeared in these pages since then, and the thousands of readers who have supported us, [...]

Ralph McInerny and I launched this journal in November 1982 with approximately $3,000 of our own money. We weren't sure we'd last for a second issue, let alone for ten years. Thanks to the more than 300 writers who have appeared in these pages since then, and the thousands of readers who have supported us, [...]

In View

A Close Call By a narrow majority the Supreme Court rejected lower federal court rulings that Operation Rescue had conspired to deprive women seeking abortions of their right to interstate travel. At stake in Bray v. Alexandria Women's Health Clinic is the scope and application of the first clause of the 1871 Civil Rights Act, [...]

In the late 1960s, New York City's cultural elites faced a grave dilemma on the issue of school decentralization. There was, on the one hand, the lingering spirit of the "Great Society" calling for "maximum feasible participation" of minorities and local communities in their schools; on the other hand, there was the liberals' historic distrust [...]

Karol Wojtyla's entire philosophical work has as its center the Ecumenical Council Vatican II, in which the author, who was consecrated bishop July 4, 1958, took part as capitular administrator, later archbishop, of the diocese of Krakow. The Acting Person (1969), the book which crowns and concludes Wojtyla's philosophical activity, was probably conceived in its [...]

Up on the third floor of the United States Catholic Conference (USCC), in an ordinary, nondescript set of gray offices along the south side of the building, sits a major cornerstone for the future of Catholicism in the former Communist world. In spite of a job so daunting it seems impossible, the Office to Aid [...]

"We all have strength enough to endure the troubles of others." —La Rochefoucauld Pity is a perplexing, ambiguous, and painful subject. It brings forth deep questions about how we do, and how we should, feel about others—those with whom we trade, vote, pray, or meet simply in print or on television. A philosopher could ask [...]

Editor's note: Rabbi Haberman is president of the Foundation for Jewish Studies in Washington, D.C.; the senior rabbi emeritus of the Washington Hebrew Congregation; and adjunct professor at the Wesley Theological Seminary. Robert Lakind conducted this interview while interning in Social and Political Studies at the American Enterprise Institute. Rabbi, please describe the circumstances behind [...]

1. Lent, le Careme in French, begins On Ash Wednesday; this year it falls on February 2.4. February is the shortest month, thus an appropriate time to state briefly what we think, thoughts, not just because we think them, but because we think them true. Pensees remind us of Pascal, Ash Wednesday of T.S. Eliot, [...]

I am no longer startled when handed a program as I enter a church wedding. The first time it happened I thought the usher gave me the church bulletin and I wondered why. Now I am accustomed to this ceremonial accessory. A veteran of weddings where earnest brides and grooms pen flowery vows, I detect [...]

After almost seven months of domestic bliss as a married woman, I feel somewhat qualified to critique the boy-meets-girl fairy tales I grew up hearing and reading. Unfortunately, most fairy tales and other romances end with the wedding, the "happily ever after" stock ending. As a result, people are good at the courtship part, having [...]

Alexander and Nicholas Humez are two brothers who like to roam through the alphabets of different languages. By vocation Alexander is a technical writer at a computer software company, and Nicholas runs a silversmithing workshop. The brothers have written three books devoted to the classical languages, A B C Et Cetera: The Life & Times [...]

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