12/01/1992

In View

Election Night in the Neighborhood On November 3, I waited for the election returns at the Ridgewood, Queens headquarters of my congressional candidate, Dennis Shea. The 31-year-old nominee of the Republican and Conservative parties ran an extraordinary campaign against incumbent Tom Manton, the check-bouncing Queens County Democratic boss. The seat, once held by Geraldine Ferraro, [...]

In View

Election Night in the Neighborhood On November 3, I waited for the election returns at the Ridgewood, Queens headquarters of my congressional candidate, Dennis Shea. The 31-year-old nominee of the Republican and Conservative parties ran an extraordinary campaign against incumbent Tom Manton, the check-bouncing Queens County Democratic boss. The seat, once held by Geraldine Ferraro, [...]

Twenty-eight years ago, I published a book called A New Generation: American and Catholic, and a little later served as advisor to a new national student publication founded by a senior at Holy Cross College, Charles Crofton, called A New Generation. This brave journal was taken over in its second year by Peter and Peggy [...]

The Roman Catholic Church is still struggling to meet the challenges of responding to Vatican II. The Church has overcome some of the difficulties that the council sought to address, but it has also inherited a new set of problems: a confused religious identity, an uncertain sense of mission, a precipitate decline in traditional morality, [...]

Remember the white boots scam? It happened in the late 1960s, at the height of the Black Power movement. One of the movement theorists, it seems, came up with the idea that the reason white people conventionally wore black and brown shoes was to effect a symbolic degradation of the Negro. By wrapping its feet [...]

Rocco Buttiglione is becoming well known to the readers of Crisis. (See his "Christian Economics 101," July-August 1992, and "Behind Centesimus Annus" July-August 1991.) He is the Pro-Rector of the International Academy of Philosophy in the Principality of Liechtenstein. I interviewed Rocco Buttiglione the last week of July at his office in Liechtenstein. He had [...]

Fifty years ago, an American infantry force stormed the beaches of western Morocco, while a smaller British group landed 850 miles to the east on the coast of Algeria. For the first time since he had come to power nine years earlier, Adolf Hitler suddenly found his realm under siege. The Allies had cracked the [...]

Invited to lecture on the philosophy of Edith Stein, I found myself preparing the manuscript within the shadow of the ancient University of Salamanca, chartered first in 1215. One of its most distinguished twentieth-century rectors was Miguel de Unamuno, known the world over as a philosopher, poet, dramatist, novelist, and essayist. Writing in Salamanca, my [...]

Several months ago, I received a letter from Proofessor John Schrems at Villanova University, an old friend and classmate. A couple of years ago, the two of us had gathered together the remarkable academic essays of Father Charles N.R. McCoy (On the Intelligibility of Political Philosophy, Catholic University of America Press, 1989). McCoy had been [...]

The little boy in the church pew was barely three years old. As the priest delivered the Sunday homily, the boy paged through a book his mother had brought to keep him occupied, but it was clear from his periodic glancing up that he was catching a few words. When the priest illustrated his point [...]

A man who has taken aboard two or three cocktails is less competent than he was before to steer a battleship down the Ambrose Channel, or to cut off a leg, or to draw up a deed of trust, or to conduct Bach's B-minor Mass, but he is immensely more competent to entertain a dinner [...]

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