09/01/1990

Victorian England witnessed a debate, carried on with intellectual force and high elegance. T.H. Huxley emerged as the champion of science, armed with the potent new doctrines of Charles Darwin. The towering figure of John Henry Newman defended the claims of religion in countless essays and in books that have become classics, such as the [...]

Victorian England witnessed a debate, carried on with intellectual force and high elegance. T.H. Huxley emerged as the champion of science, armed with the potent new doctrines of Charles Darwin. The towering figure of John Henry Newman defended the claims of religion in countless essays and in books that have become classics, such as the [...]

The apparent collapse of the Soviet and communist threat around the world raises the important question of what principles should guide U.S. foreign policy during the 1990s and beyond. Since World War II, American policy is most consistently characterized by anti-communism or resistance to Soviet (and for a time, Chinese) expansionism. Although U.S. leaders pursued [...]

The question, Why are you a Catholic?, arouses in me, I'll admit, certain misgivings. One reason, the first that comes to mind, is that the prospect of giving one's "testament," saying it straight out, puts me in mind of an old radio program on which people, mostly show business types as I recall, uttered their [...]

Despite the recent well publicized backlash against relativism, this persistent philosophy remains entrenched in the minds and hearts of the nation's liberal thinkers. It also remains the dominant viewpoint on most university campuses. Popular works such as Allan Bloom's The Closing of the American Mind have apparently had little impact on the power and appeal [...]

Liberals are too liberal to be radicals. To be a radical is to go to the roots. Liberals don't go to the roots; they only scratch the surface. The only way to go to the roots is to bring religion into education, into politics, into business. To bring religion into the profane is the best [...]

Until very recently, the thought of Friedrich A. von Hayek found few echoes in Western academic life. Economic theory, like thought in the Western academy in general, was dominated by perspectives which emphasized the economy as an undifferentiated whole managed by the government. Thinkers who saw free markets as substantially self-regulating were decried as "anachronistic" [...]

In an auditorium resounding with over 150 students, only a fraction of whom are formally enrolled in the class, a stout, Chesterton-like figure, clad in slightly wrinkled black clerics and a loosened Roman collar, strides across a raised platform and in a melodious voice declaims, "Death is the ultimate deadline for the ultimate decision. The [...]

"Can we be good without God?" was the provocative headline on the cover of a recent issue of The Atlantic. The author, Glenn Tinder, a political scientist at the University of Massachusetts at Boston, spent thousands of words leading up to his conclusion, which merely restated the cover's question. Tinder's implied answer was ultimately "no," [...]

When John Paul II recently visited the Dutch island of Curacao in the Caribbean, it was, as I recall, the ninety-third different political entity he has visited. Since then he has logged a couple more. No doubt, John Paul has more frequent-flyer miles than all the Apostles and all the previous popes put together. No [...]

Common Wisdom: Altar Ego

If anyone told me twenty-five years ago there would be women in the pulpit, I'd have been incredulous; if told I'd be one of them I'd have been aghast. Yet here I am, anno Domini 1990, completing ten years as parish lector. My presence near the altar is more accommodation than conversion to the practice. [...]

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