11/01/1988

One of the mainstays of the left these days is to speak ill of "individualism," while employing an uncritical use of "community." The U.S. Catholic bishops joined this chorus in their pastoral on the U.S. economy. So did Robert Bellah and colleagues in Habits of the Heart, a useful and good but oddly bent argument. [...]

One of the mainstays of the left these days is to speak ill of "individualism," while employing an uncritical use of "community." The U.S. Catholic bishops joined this chorus in their pastoral on the U.S. economy. So did Robert Bellah and colleagues in Habits of the Heart, a useful and good but oddly bent argument. [...]

Recently the National Catholic Register ran a brief news story with the headline, "'Consistent ethic' theory clarified." The story ran: "Answering critics of his 'consistent ethic of life' philosophy, Cardinal Joseph Bernardin of Chicago said August 8 that in the final analysis Catholics can vote against a political candidate because of the candidate's support for [...]

Not often in history has a single event had the multifold and far reaching effect upon a whole civilization and, more poignantly, Western consciousness than the Great War. Prior to 1914, from at least the eighteenth century, in the West one of history's great calms reigned, a calm made up of rationality, civility, of respect [...]

Almost every priest spends between five and eight years in a seminary. During this time he is formed spiritually, theologically, and psychologically. It is a time which has a profound impact on the young man who experiences it. It is apparent from the news reports, and informal conversations with other spiritual directors, that many of [...]

Still Hope for Seminaries Francis Sullivan's article on seminaries raises some important questions about the manner in which the Church presently prepares her clergy for orders. I read it with a more than typical curiosity, since I was myself, last year, asked to leave one of the seminaries he indicts: Theological College in Washington, D.C. [...]

In recent years a number of books have appeared in which the authors have described their experiences in Soviet prisons and punishment camps. Some of these eyewitness accounts are of particular interest because they deal not only with the outward effects of loss of freedom, but also with the deep processes of change which take [...]

How Can We Keep From Sliding the Rest of the Way Down the Slippery Slope? When the U. S. Department of Health called for a halt in fetal-tissue transplants pending further study of the ethical problems involved, I was sharply reminded that I myself have been evading the most basic of these problems for a [...]

James Boswell reached Motiers, Switzerland on December 14, 1764. He had climbed on horseback over a peak he called the "Mountain Lapidosa"—the "Rocky Mountain," probably Mount Chasseron—but almost the first thing he did was to "alight" at the door of Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Boswell was twenty-four and wanted to "use his time well." By some fast [...]

In two solid weeks of Olympic television watching, in interview after interview of boxing and track-and-field stars, I have heard the name of God spoken (reverently!) more than I could have in a year's worth of prime time. The simplicity and unself-consciousness with which people like Florence Griffith Joyner gave credit where credit was due [...]

Television is the greatest single contributor to the trivialization of modern life. At first a spectator of, then an intruder into, now the fabricator of the events it shows us, television news has reduced political campaigning to the level of the advertising and promotion of products. We all know this. It is a cliche. How [...]

Imagine that you are hearing a piece by Mozart played at the wrong tempo by a first-rate orchestra. All the notes in the score are sounded. The familiar melodies and counter-melodies run their course. The composer's instrumentation is adhered to, and the players achieve an aural voluptuousness that ravishes the ear. Yet the result is [...]

MENU