10/01/1984

From an economic, theological and moral point of view there is much that is of value in the market economy: for the Christian the challenge is to incorporate those aspects within a framework that is distinctively subject to Christian value. Editor's Note: The article by Brian Griffiths below — and the one following, by William [...]

From an economic, theological and moral point of view there is much that is of value in the market economy: for the Christian the challenge is to incorporate those aspects within a framework that is distinctively subject to Christian value. Editor's Note: The article by Brian Griffiths below — and the one following, by William [...]

Does Christianity proclaim the materially poor to be God's "elect," while the wealthy are to be treated as enemies of the Kingdom? The author examines the "evidence" and finds it wanting. Is there a "divine bias to the poor"? Does God's special blessing rest on a particular socio-economic class whose merit is that its members [...]

If I am to answer the question, "How would Christ solve modern problems if He were on earth today?", I must answer it plainly; and for those of my faith there is only one answer. Christ is on earth today; alive on a thousand altars; and He does solve people's problems exactly as He did [...]

Gov. Mario Cuomo's lecture at Notre Dame University last month, "Religious Belief and Public Morality: A Catholic Governor's Perspective," was a significant event. It was perhaps the most detailed and thorough attempt by a major Catholic office holder to set forth a reasoned "pro-choice" position on the abortion issue. As a rhetorical exercise, Mr. Cuomo's [...]

It is as if A Man For All Seasons were being rewritten with Cromwell in the role of hero, the triumph of the trimmer being presented as a model of Catholic behavior. Thomas More, a pitiable figure, imagines that his conscience should dictate actions and omissions in the public order. He would actually prefer saving [...]

"We reject the idea that candidates satisfy the requirements of rational analysis in saying their personal views should not influence their policy decisions; the implied dichotomy — between personal morality and public policy — is simply not tenable in any adequate view of both." Thus spoke Bishop James Malone, president of the U.S. Catholic Conference [...]

Despite the fact that the United States Catholic Conference has taken dozens, even hundreds, of positions on public policy issues in the name of the American bishops over the past decade, on only two occasions has the media paid much attention: to the pastoral letter, "The Challenge of Peace," and to the recent statement disavowing [...]

It is reasonable to hope that the 1984 campaign will be remembered as a moment of significant change in the way Americans understand the social experiment of which they are a part. Bishop Malone's statement on behalf of the USCC reinforces that hope. Others will and should criticize aspects of its reasoning, both with respect [...]

In the wake of the dispute between Governor Cuomo and Archbishop O'Connor, Bishop James W. Malone, president of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops (NCCB), has issued a statement purporting to clarify the role of Catholic bishops in American politics. Malone's statement also quite clearly criticizes Governor Cuomo's position that he would not let his [...]

The U.S. Catholic Conference statement on Religion and the '84 Campaign may have come about because some politicians — notably, some Catholic politicians — cannot seem to differentiate between legally determined religious practices and general moral principles. Legally determined religious practices, as one Catholic governor has pointed out, cannot and should not be forced on [...]

It would be a mistake to escalate Bishop Malone's statement into a major declaration by the United States Catholic Conference. The statement was originally intended to be released after the Republican and Democratic Party conventions — to remind the American public that while bishops address issues of public policy, they do not endorse or disavow [...]

"But she is not really a Catholic" — words recently written about Geraldine Ferraro by Ben Omann. What do they mean? Ben Omann is a partisan politician, not a theologian. As an obscure representative in the Minnesota legislature, he is hardly competent or authorized to decide on the validity of anyone's religion. And since Congresswoman [...]

It is logical to say "The Catholic position is ..." when one speaks of doctrine and the credal core. If one believes, as I do, that there is a Christ-established Church ordained precisely to preserve, offer, and teach the truths of Christ's revelation, and that it has a structure and authority, then it is, indeed, [...]

Those who say they are opposed to abortion but refuse legally to prohibit it are not opposed to abortion as Catholics are opposed to it. There is a growing number of Catholic politicians who put distance between themselves and the teaching of the Church on abortion, not the least of whom are the Democratic Party [...]

 Editor's Note: The incommensurability between occasion and reaction has been called the mark of genius. Mary Daly's new work, Pure Lust: Elemental Feminist Philosophy (Beacon Press 471 pp., $18.95), is not, a first blush (we speak advisedly) the kind of book we would want to review, let alone devote a symposium to. It reaches a [...]

Editor's Note: The incommensurability between occasion and reaction has been called the mark of genius. Mary Daly's new work, Pure Lust: Elemental Feminist Philosophy (Beacon Press 471 pp., $18.95), is not, a first blush (we speak advisedly) the kind of book we would want to review, let alone devote a symposium to. It reaches a [...]

Editor's Note: The incommensurability between occasion and reaction has been called the mark of genius. Mary Daly's new work, Pure Lust: Elemental Feminist Philosophy (Beacon Press 471 pp., $18.95), is not, a first blush (we speak advisedly) the kind of book we would want to review, let alone devote a symposium to. It reaches a [...]

Editor's Note: The incommensurability between occasion and reaction has been called the mark of genius. Mary Daly's new work, Pure Lust: Elemental Feminist Philosophy (Beacon Press 471 pp., $18.95), is not, a first blush (we speak advisedly) the kind of book we would want to review, let alone devote a symposium to. It reaches a [...]

Editor's Note: The incommensurability between occasion and reaction has been called the mark of genius. Mary Daly's new work, Pure Lust: Elemental Feminist Philosophy (Beacon Press 471 pp., $18.95), is not, a first blush (we speak advisedly) the kind of book we would want to review, let alone devote a symposium to. It reaches a [...]

In my previous “Letter from Europe” (C in C, July 1984), I briefly recalled the early initiatives towards European unification taken in response to the postwar totalitarian challenge. As it then appeared, the ideal of a federal European state seemed to serve a variety of purposes such as: the safeguarding of democracy, the overcoming of [...]

Is there a barrier in American society against the Catholic politician who does not intend to compromise his or her Catholicism in the exercise of official public duty? How dense is the wall of separation between Church and State? Or is there one at all? Separation is not a constitutional principle. It was coined as [...]

MENU