Continental Congress

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The Continental Congress was a convention of delegates called together from the Thirteen Colonies, which became the governing body of the United States during the American Revolution. The Congress met from 1774 to 1789 in three incarnations. The Second Continental Congress convened on May 10, 1775, at Philadelphia's State House, unanimously passing the Declaration of Independence the following year on July 2, 1776, and publicly announcing the decision two days later. Thomas Jefferson of Virginia drafted the declaration, and John Adams was a leader in the debates in favor of its adoption. John Hancock of Massachusetts was the president during those debates. To govern during the American Revolutionary War, the Second Continental Congress continued, meeting at various locations, until it became the Congress of the Confederation when the Articles of Confederation were ratified on March 1, 1781.

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