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    • Jim

      “Some men wrest a living from nature. This is called work. Some men wrest a living from those who wrest a living from nature. This is called trade. Some men wrest a living from those who wrest a living from those who wrest a living from nature. This is called finance.”
      ~ Fr. Vincent McNabb

      Money has evolved from a medium of exchange to a means of wealth in and of itself. The world’s financial problems will not be solved until the monopoly of the international private banking cartel’s monopoly on issuing debt backed money is taken away from the central banks and nations start issuing their own debt free credit.

      For a free education check out;

      http://www.simondixon.org/

    • Jim

      Pope John Paul II has denounced the money dictatorship many times and advocated reform of the financial and economic systems realizing that the economic system must be put at the service of man.

      His 1991 encyclical Centesimus Annus, discusses the division of labor, property, prices, profits, debate, development, sound money, trade, the environment, and a host of other issues.

      Some other quotes:

      “One must denounce the existence of economic, financial and social mechanisms which, although they are manipulated by people, often function almost automatically, thus accentuating the situation of wealth for some and poverty for the rest.” (John Paul II, Sollicitudo Rei Socialis, n. 16.)

      “I appeal to those in positions of responsibility, and to all involved, to work together to find appropriate solutions to the problems at hand, including a restructuring of the economy, so that human needs be put before mere financial gain.” (John Paul II in Newfoundland, Sept. 12, 1984.)

      “An essential condition is to provide the economy with a human meaning and logic. It is necessary to free the various fields of existence from the dominion of subjugating economism.

      Economic requirements must be put in their right place and a multiform social fabric must be created, which will prevent standardization.

      No one is dispensed from collaborating in this task… Christians, wherever you are, assume your share of responsibility in this immense effort for the human restructuring of the city. Faith makes it a duty for you.” (John Paul II to the workers of Sao Paulo, Brazil, June 3, 1980.)

      Good programs on the fallacy of finance

      Quants: The Alchemists of Wall Street

      http://youtu.be/ed2FWNWwE3I

      THE ASCENT OF MONEY

      http://www.pbs.org/wnet/ascentofmoney/

      PBS Frontline: The Warning

      http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/warning/

    • Carl

      Wresting a living: Fr. Vincent McNabb’s quote defines capitalism well. And I mean that in a good way.

      But today too many are wresting a living arresting the living of others under the guise of a utopian planned society. This being accomplished primarily by socialistic governments who first created and now manage the international private banking cartel.

    • Gabriel Austin

      One of the best discussions of the money question and how we got here is Christopher Hollis’ TWO NATIONS. He begins with Henry VIII and from there to the fraudulent Fraud Act of 1688 which deprived most Englishmen of their property by the skillful device of demanding to see leases, which until then non-existent. This reinforced the growth of the Whig money power. The which in turn was eclipsed by the growth of banking and what Hollis calls double money – the issuance of loans that could not be covered by the bank’s assets. This led eventually to “banks too big to be allowed to fail”.
      The Church’s condemnation of usury seems commonsensical in an age of 18% [and higher] interest rates. The whole system is dishonest; and, further, injurious to the poor [of all nations].
      There is the tale of the farmer who kept his cash hidden at home. His grandson mocked him for this. Thinking he must keep up with the times, the farmer put his money in a bank. He enjoyed being able to write checks. One day his grandson came to him to say that his account was empty. To which the grandfather “You need money? I’ll write you a check”.
      Is this not what the Federal Reserve is doing?

    • richard

      Thank you for this very informative posting.

    • Kenny

      It is truly amazing just how naïve and clueless many in our Catholic community are as to the harmful effect of our government’s reckless spending. The irresponsible spending causes higher unemployment, inflation, interest rates and gas prices. Guess who is hurt the most by these consequences? The poor. Yet, there are many who continue to cry for more and more spending.

    • Susan

      It is telling that Keynes, biographies up till the 50′s notwithstanding, was actually a homosexual. Which puts a great new insight on his quote, “In the long run, we’re all dead”. He, and other sterile fellow travelers of the 20th century (including the contraceptors and aborters), indeed would have no posterity to actually consider.

      Read “Degenerate Moderns” by E. Michael Jones for more on this destructively influential man and similar others.

    • DAN

      @ Samuel Gregg

      Are you including Thomas Woods in your list of Catholic thinkers “studying our debt and deficit problems from standpoints equally well-informed by economics and sound Catholic moral reflection”?

      If you DO include him in that category, why didn’t you mention him?

      Dan